Creativity Doesn’t Require Isolation; Sociogram Analysis

Topics: Creativity, Design, Innovation Pages: 3 (872 words) Published: April 6, 2013
Creativity Doesn’t Require Isolation; Sociogram Analysis
10/7/12

Creativity Doesn’t Require Isolation; Sociogram Analysis
Managing creative work requires an understanding of how relationships can enhance or impair the innovation process. Sutton and Kelley (1997) proposed that outsiders enhance creative work and challenged the proposition that encourages isolation as an effective medium for creativity in order to avoid the “audience effect”. The sociograms presented here will illustrate two models to manage creativity and will represent the relationship between the Creative Manager, the creative team and outside sources. Isolated Design

Consult Appendix A for a key that represents the different type of relationships found in the sociograms presented in this analysis. The first sociogram represents the Isolated Designed that was typically used to manage creativity.

This design represents formal relationships between all members involved in the creative process. The design is transaction-oriented and focuses in the individual work that creative personnel creates to meet the needs of the client. Relationships are based on rules and expectations set by the creative manager who separates the creative team from outside sources like the client and reporters. This design supports the views of those who believe that outside influence in the creative process trigger the audience effect. The sociogram illustrates how the creative manager ensures the privacy and freedom of interruption by the creative team. Robbins and Judge (2011) explained what needs to happen to foster creativity: Environmental stimulants that foster creativity include a culture that encourages the flow of ideas; fair and constructive judgment of ideas; rewards and recognition for creative work, and a supervisor who communicates effectively, shows confidence in others, and supports the work group; and work group members who support and trust each other (p.69). This Isolated Design is not...

References: Robbins, S. P., & Judge, T. A. (2012). The Individual in the Organization. In Essentials of Organizational Behavior. (11th ed.). (pp. 2-13). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education Inc..
Sutton, R.I., & Kelley, T.A. (1997, Fall). Creativity doesn 't require isolation: Why product
designers bring visitors "backstage". California Management Review, 40(1), 75-91.
Appendix A: Key
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